Jun 30 2011

Bruce Springsteen veröffentlicht Nachruf auf Clarence Clemons

Bruce Springsteen hat auf seiner offiziellen Homepage einen Nachruf auf Clarence „Big Man“ Clemons veröffentlicht.

This is a slightly revised version of the eulogy I delivered for Clarence at his memorial. I’d like to thank all our fans and friends who have comforted us over the past difficult weeks.FOR THE BIG MAN

I’ve been sitting here listening to everyone talk about Clarence and staring at that photo of the two of us right there. It’s a picture of Scooter and The Big Man, people who we were sometimes. As you can see in this particular photo, Clarence is admiring his muscles and I’m pretending to be nonchalant while leaning upon him. I leaned on Clarence a lot; I made a career out of it in some ways.

Those of us who shared Clarence’s life, shared with him his love and his confusion. Though „C“ mellowed with age, he was always a wild and unpredictable ride. Today I see his sons Nicky, Chuck, Christopher and Jarod sitting here and I see in them the reflection of a lot of C’s qualities. I see his light, his darkness, his sweetness, his roughness, his gentleness, his anger, his brilliance, his handsomeness, and his goodness. But, as you boys know your pop was a not a day at the beach. „C“ lived a life where he did what he wanted to do and he let the chips, human and otherwise, fall where they may. Like a lot of us your pop was capable of great magic and also of making quite an amazing mess. This was just the nature of your daddy and my beautiful friend. Clarence’s unconditional love, which was very real, came with a lot of conditions. Your pop was a major project and always a work in progress. „C“ never approached anything linearly, life never proceeded in a straight line. He never went A… B…. C…. D. It was always A… J…. C…. Z… Q… I….! That was the way Clarence lived and made his way through the world. I know that can lead to a lot of confusion and hurt, but your father also carried a lot of love with him, and I know he loved each of you very very dearly.

It took a village to take care of Clarence Clemons. Tina, I’m so glad you’re here. Thank you for taking care of my friend, for loving him. Victoria, you’ve been a loving, kind and caring wife to Clarence and you made a huge difference in his life at a time when the going was not always easy. To all of „C’s“ vast support network, names too numerous to mention, you know who you are and we thank you. Your rewards await you at the pearly gates. My pal was a tough act but he brought things into your life that were unique and when he turned on that love light, it illuminated your world. I was lucky enough to stand in that light for almost 40 years, near Clarence’s heart, in the Temple of Soul.

So a little bit of history: from the early days when Clarence and I traveled together, we’d pull up to the evening’s lodgings and within minutes „C“ would transform his room into a world of his own. Out came the colored scarves to be draped over the lamps, the scented candles, the incense, the patchouli oil, the herbs, the music, the day would be banished, entertainment would come and go, and Clarence the Shaman would reign and work his magic, night after night. Clarence’s ability to enjoy Clarence was incredible. By 69, he’d had a good run, because he’d already lived about 10 lives, 690 years in the life of an average man. Every night, in every place, the magic came flying out of C’s suitcase. As soon as success allowed, his dressing room would take on the same trappings as his hotel room until a visit there was like a trip to a sovereign nation that had just struck huge oil reserves. „C“ always knew how to live. Long before Prince was out of his diapers, an air of raunchy mysticism ruled in the Big Man’s world. I’d wander in from my dressing room, which contained several fine couches and some athletic lockers, and wonder what I was doing wrong! Somewhere along the way all of this was christened the Temple of Soul; and „C“ presided smilingly over its secrets, and its pleasures. Being allowed admittance to the Temple’s wonders was a lovely thing.

As a young child my son Sam became enchanted with the Big Man… no surprise. To a child Clarence was a towering fairy tale figure, out of some very exotic storybook. He was a dreadlocked giant, with great hands and a deep mellifluous voice sugared with kindness and regard. And… to Sammy, who was just a little white boy, he was deeply and mysteriously black. In Sammy’s eyes, „C“ must have appeared as all of the African continent, shot through with American cool, rolled into one welcoming and loving figure. So… Sammy decided to pass on my work shirts and became fascinated by Clarence’s suits and his royal robes. He declined a seat in dad’s van and opted for „C’s“ stretch limousine, sitting by his side on the slow cruise to the show. He decided dinner in front of the hometown locker just wouldn’t do, and he’d saunter up the hall and disappear into the Temple of Soul.

Of course, also enchanted was Sam’s dad, from the first time I saw my pal striding out of the shadows of a half empty bar in Asbury Park, a path opening up before him; here comes my brother, here comes my sax man, my inspiration, my partner, my lifelong friend. Standing next to Clarence was like standing next to the baddest ass on the planet. You were proud, you were strong, you were excited and laughing with what might happen, with what together, you might be able to do. You felt like no matter what the day or the night brought, nothing was going to touch you. Clarence could be fragile but he also emanated power and safety, and in some funny way we became each other’s protectors; I think perhaps I protected „C“ from a world where it still wasn’t so easy to be big and black. Racism was ever present and over the years together, we saw it. Clarence’s celebrity and size did not make him immune. I think perhaps „C“ protected me from a world where it wasn’t always so easy to be an insecure, weird and skinny white boy either. But, standing together we were badass, on any given night, on our turf, some of the baddest asses on the planet. We were united, we were strong, we were righteous, we were unmovable, we were funny, we were corny as hell and as serious as death itself. And we were coming to your town to shake you and to wake you up. Together, we told an older, richer story about the possibilities of friendship that transcended those I’d written in my songs and in my music. Clarence carried it in his heart. It was a story where the Scooter and the Big Man not only busted the city in half, but we kicked ass and remade the city, shaping it into the kind of place where our friendship would not be such an anomaly. And that… that’s what I’m gonna miss. The chance to renew that vow and double down on that story on a nightly basis, because that is something, that is the thing that we did together… the two of us. Clarence was big, and he made me feel, and think, and love, and dream big. How big was the Big Man? Too fucking big to die. And that’s just the facts. You can put it on his grave stone, you can tattoo it over your heart. Accept it… it’s the New World.

Clarence doesn’t leave the E Street Band when he dies. He leaves when we die.

So, I’ll miss my friend, his sax, the force of nature his sound was, his glory, his foolishness, his accomplishments, his face, his hands, his humor, his skin, his noise, his confusion, his power, his peace. But his love and his story, the story that he gave me, that he whispered in my ear, that he allowed me to tell… and that he gave to you… is gonna carry on. I’m no mystic, but the undertow, the mystery and power of Clarence and my friendship leads me to believe we must have stood together in other, older times, along other rivers, in other cities, in other fields, doing our modest version of god’s work… work that’s still unfinished. So I won’t say goodbye to my brother, I’ll simply say, see you in the next life, further on up the road, where we will once again pick up that work, and get it done.

Big Man, thank you for your kindness, your strength, your dedication, your work, your story. Thanks for the miracle… and for letting a little white boy slip through the side door of the Temple of Soul.

SO LADIES AND GENTLEMAN… ALWAYS LAST, BUT NEVER LEAST. LET’S HEAR IT FOR THE MASTER OF DISASTER, the BIG KAHUNA, the MAN WITH A PHD IN SAXUAL HEALING, the DUKE OF PADUCAH, the KING OF THE WORLD, LOOK OUT OBAMA! THE NEXT BLACK PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES EVEN THOUGH HE’S DEAD… YOU WISH YOU COULD BE LIKE HIM BUT YOU CAN’T! LADIES AND GENTLEMEN, THE BIGGEST MAN YOU’VE EVER SEEN!… GIVE ME A C-L-A-R-E-N-C-E. WHAT’S THAT SPELL? CLARENCE! WHAT’S THAT SPELL? CLARENCE! WHAT’S THAT SPELL? CLARENCE! … amen.

I’m gonna leave you today with a quote from the Big Man himself, which he shared on the plane ride home from Buffalo, the last show of the last tour. As we celebrated in the front cabin congratulating one another and telling tales of the many epic shows, rocking nights and good times we’d shared, „C“ sat quietly, taking it all in, then he raised his glass, smiled and said to all gathered, „This could be the start of something big.“

Love you, „C“.

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Jun 28 2011

Die Zukunft der E Street Band …

Der amerikanische Journalist Jay Lustig vom „Star Ledger“ stellt sich die Frage, wie die E Street Band ohne Clarence Clemons weitermachen wird.

Hier ein kurzer Ausschnitt aus dem Online-Artikel:

So what can Springsteen do?
The most straightforward solution — hire another sax player — is also the most problematic. Another musician can never offer the resonance that Clemons did, just by showing up.
Some fans have brought up the prospect of Clemons’ nephew — Jake Clemons, who plays sax as well as guitar — stepping into the role. Of course, drummer Jay Weinberg, Max Weinberg’s son, filled in for his father for portions of the 2009 “Working on a Dream” tour, and that worked out well. So that’s one possibility — and one that would at least offer some sentimental uplift.
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Jun 25 2011

Max Weinberg: „There is a great deal of sadness“

E Street Band Drummer Max Weinberg wird am kommenden Montag und Dienstag (27. und 28. Juni 2011) mit dem ehemaligen CHICAGO Mitglied Bill Chamlin im „Dakota Jazz Club“ in Minneapolis, MN auftreten. In einem Interview mit dem „Minneapolis Star Tribune“ erzählte der 60jährige, dass wegen Clarence Clemons Tod eine sehr harte Woche hinter ihm liegt.

Zu Clarence Clemons Tod am 18. Juni 2011 sagte Max Weinberg folgendes:

„There is a great deal of sadness,“ he said. „The depth of emotion springing from around the world at the news of Clarence’s death is just remarkable. It’s appreciated. It’s certainly well noticed by all of us who were so close to Clarence. It’s a monumental loss, personally, professionally — in every way. It’s stunning. It’s something that is really very difficult to wrap your head around.“
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Jun 25 2011

Wolfgang’s Vault: Clarence Clemons Live in Concert

Auch auf der Live-Musikplattform „Wolfgang’s Vault“ wird an Clarence  Clemons erinnert.

In honor of Clarence Clemons, who sadly passed away this weekend, we’ve compiled this tribute playlist featuring a few songs from every concert in the Vault on which the Big Man appears. Besides a number of sets with Bruce Springsteen and the E-Street Band from between 1973 and 1988, that also includes performances with his Red Bank Rockers in 1983, songs from a 1987 Legendary Ladies of Rock concert that included The Big Man in the house band, and the Grateful Dead’s 1988 New Year’s Eve show when Clarence sat in for a few numbers.

Folgende Konzerte kann man sich kostenlos anhören:

  • Clarence Clemons and the Red Bank Rockers – 25. November 1983 Early Show
    Ripley’s Music Hall – Philadelphia, PA
    mehr Infos
  • Clarence Clemons and the Red Bank Rockers – 25. November 1983 Late Show
    Ripley’s Music Hall – Philadelphia, PA
    mehr Infos
  • Clarence Clemons – 22. Januar 1984
    Ripley’s Music Hall – Philadelphia, PA
    mehr Infos

Ausserdem findet man auf „Wolfgang’s Vault“ zahlreiche Springsteen Konzerte aus den 1970er und 1980er Jahren:

  • Bruce Springsteen – Estadio River Plate, Buenos Aires (Argentinien)
    15.10.1988 – 14 Songs – Gesamtlaufzeit: 84, Minuten
    mehr Infos
  • Bruce Springsteen – Berkeley Community Theatre, Berkeley, CA
    02.03.1972 – 7 Songs – Gesamtlaufzeit: 43 Minuten
    mehr Infos
  • Bruce Springsteen – Interview
    09.07.1978 – Interview – Gesamtlaufzeit: 43 Minuten
    mehr Infos
  • Bruce Springsteen – Winterland, San Francisco, CA
    15.12.1978 – 30 Songs – Gesamtlaufzeit: 166 Minuten
    mehr Infos
  • Bruce Springsteen – Olympia Stadium, Stockholm (Schweden)
    03.07.1988 – 14 Songs – Gesamtlaufzeit: 88 Minuten
    mehr Infos
  • Bruce Springsteen – Max’s Kansas City, New York, NY
    31.01.1973 – 8 Songs – Gesamtlaufzeit: 56 Minuten
    mehr Infos

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Jun 24 2011

Little Stevens Underground Garage: „For Clarence“

Little Stevens Radioshow „The Underground Garage“ wird am Sonntag unter dem Motto „For Clarence“ stehen. Van Zandt wird aus dem Leben des erfolgreichen Saxophonisten erzählen und natürlich auch Songs spielen, die der „Big Man“ mit Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band aufgenommen hat.

Presseinfo:

As most of you know by now we lost Clarence Clemons a few days ago.
The Rock and Roll world lost an irreplaceable performer. The E Street Band lost its second member. And I lost another life long friend.
So this week in the Underground Garage we are changing our format to do a tribute to Clarence, his solo work with The Red Bank Rockers, his acting roles, and of course his unforgettable work with the E Street Band.
So come celebrate “The Big Man” this weekend in the Underground Garage.

Das Programm wird über das SIRIUS SATELLITE RADIONETWORK (kosenpflichtig) ausgestrahlt. Im Laufe der kommenden Woche kann man die Show auch kostenfrei über das Internet anhören.

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